Review: Red Clocks by Leni Zumas

Review: Red Clocks by Leni Zumas

As an ambassador for Little Brown, I was so lucky to be able to receive a copy of Red Clocks by Leni Zumas for review. I knew that this book had been getting a ton of hype and that a lot of people were really excited about it, but I was worried that the hype was a little biased just based on the fact that it was one of the first novels of feminist literature published this year. But trust me when I say this, the hype is WARRANTED. In fact, I don’t know if it’s even being hyped enough.

Red Clocks follows the story of four women (named only as The Biographer, The Daughter, The Mender, and The Wife) who are living and dealing with a time in the United States where abortion is outlawed. Not only is abortion outlawed, but because of the overturn of Roe v Wade, a snowball effect of reproductive rights are repealed as a result.

The Biographer, a single teacher in her forties, struggles with the notion that she will never be able to have children. Despite her many trips to the doctor’s office with 100 different medications to try and methods to test, The Biographer remains unable to conceive. This issue is further exacerbated by the fact that IVF has also been outlawed, as the government feels that the fertilized egg is a “human being and cannot consent to being implanted” (seems crazy, but I would not be surprised if this became a reality). Not only that, but another deadline is looming on the horizon for her: Soon, the conservative government will put in place a law that will require each child being adopted to be placed in a home with two parents, one mother, and one father. Her hopes of ever being able to have a child of her own dwindle and she’s left with nothing but self-doubt and depression.

The second character, referred to as The Daughter, is a high school student who finds herself to be pregnant after an encounter with a boy who clearly proves that he wants nothing to do with her after he got his way. The Daughter, struggling with her predicament and her need to hide it from her family and everyone around her, starts to panic. Just like what happened in REAL LIFE before Roe v Wade, The Daughter begins to look for places where she can have her “situation taken care of.” She consults the town “witch” (also known to us as The Mender), attempts to leave the country and flee to Canada where abortion is still legal (leave it to Canada to still be acting right), and tries looking for sketchy places that will do it illegally (even if it is totally unsanitary). All she wants is for this baby to be gone at any cost.

The third character, The Mender, is a local woman whose family has been accused of “witchcraft” for many generations. She uses natural herbs to help women with issues they face including a tea mixture that is said to cause abortion naturally. When women come to her, she takes care of them, no questions asked. But when she gets mixed up with the wrong woman, there will be hell to pay. And why does The Daughter look so familiar to her?

The last character, The Wife, struggles with the fact that she wants out of her marriage and away from her children. She now despises being a mother and the thought of caring for her children any longer sends her into a dangerous mindset. To be honest with you, it took me awhile to understand The Wife’s place in this novel and after reading the reviews of a few others, I came to the conclusion that her role is there to further the question “What is a woman’s place in society?” Clearly, the wife does not want to be a wife or a mother, but because of societal expectations, she was forced into these roles. There is even some symbolism around her of a small animal being burnt to a rubbery crisp and in my opinion, this represents who she is: Someone who is slowly burning and dying under the pressure to be who people expect her to be.

Overall, I loved this book. It did so much for me that I didn’t expect it to and frankly, even though it’s labeled as “dystopian”, there was nothing unbelievable about this book. I could very easily see any of the things that happened in this book happening in real life, especially under the current administration. I think that’s what makes this book all the more unsettling: We are so close to seeing this book become nonfiction.

Overall, I gave this book 5/5 stars. It is my favorite book I have read yet this year and I am thrilled that Book of the Month Club made this a pick so that more and more people can enjoy this and take it as a warning of what is to come.

Thank you to Little Brown for sending me a copy for review!

Review: Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Review: Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Look, I know what you’re thinking. I am late to the party on this one. Fangirl has been sitting on my shelf for YEARS now just waiting to be cracked open. But trust me, had I known that I was going to love it as much as I did, I wouldn’t have waited this long.

Overall, I LOVED this book. I loved that the main character, Cath was so incredibly relatable in every way. I loved that her romance with (no spoilers) her crush was realistic and not the average “uhhh… yeah right…” mush fest that some YA can slip into. I loved that there were multiple mental illness themes, addiction themes, drug use themes, aggression themes, LGBT representation, sex positive themes, and family tension themes (all of which made the book that much more realistic). Liked I said, I loved it!

This book earned a 5-star rating for me and here is why:

What this book made me feel: First and foremost, Fangirl made me feel nostalgic for my own first year of college and for falling in love with my now husband who I met during my junior year. While those who are freshman in college are legally and technically adults, there is still so much childlike wonder and fun in those who are just starting their journeys away from home. I also felt so connected to Cath as a character. In the beginning to the novel, I admit, she annoyed me a bit because she was a bit whiny and angsty. But as I kept reading and her character really started to full form, I realized that a lot of her angst was a cover up for the anxiety she was feeling about college and in general. I completely relate to that feeling, especially when I was just staring at my new university. I also was able to really empathize with Cath’s family issues. Her mom, Laura, abandoning her as a child is not something that I went through, but as a child of divorced parents, I really understood her resentment toward her mother and how her life had waves of repercussions due to being in a single-parent family. Her dedication to her sister was another thing I was able to connect with, as I would do just about anything to keep my own sister safe if she were in a situation like Wren was in (again, no spoilers).

What this book made me think: Due to this being a YA novel, I admit that it didn’t make me “think” too much, per se. I think this book was heavy on the “feeling” aspect and that it was intended to be that way. I will say that Cath’s goals and perseverance toward her dream and her steadfast dedication to being exactly who she is really resonated with me. It made me think about my own goals for my career and life and reminded me to not let anyone, including myself, get in the way of my dreams!

What I learned from this book: The one main thing I learned from this novel is that there is so much importance, bravery, and honor in being genuinely who you are. Despite her friends and family kind of teasing Cath for liking something nerdy, she was unapologetic and continued to embrace what she was passionate about. This was a huge motivator for me because I happen to like a few nerdy things like Cath and I too receive teasing prods from my friends, family, and coworkers. But I like what I like and everyone else can either deal with it or get outta my life, right?! Right! 

Again, I can’t say enough how much I loved this book. I would highly recommend this to anyone who hasn’t read it yet, even if YA isn’t normally your genre of choice. It’s cute, funny, romantic, and just enough nerdy to add something extra as the cherry on top! 

5/5 stars for this adorable read!

Thank you so much for reading!

-Alisa

Why Reading Saved My Life in 2017

Why Reading Saved My Life in 2017

There is an unwritten agreement between my books and I. I open them, and they help me breathe and live. To many bookworms, this is a common agreement. In fact, there is a famous quote that reads

“She read books as one would breathe air, to fill up and live.” -Anne Dillard

This quote has always been true to me, but this year it came to life in ways that I never would have imagined.

2017 was a rough year for me and the end of 2016 set me up to have one of the worst years of my life. In late 2016, I found out that not one, but two of my VERY close loved ones had been diagnosed with cancer. This was a shock to me, as both of these family members were people who had never struggled with their health until this point. My family had a hard time coping with the news, and we still are. Then, of course, November 8, 2016 rolls around and a man (read: demon) was elected as president. This threw me into a constant state of fear, anger at the world and at him, worry for the horrible things surely to come (spoiler alert to past me: you were right to be concerned), and disbelief that a country I had previously had pride in suddenly made me feel shame to even be associated with it. But that was only the beginning.

Throughout 2017, the following things happened that made this year a not-so-great one: Seven, yes, seven of my family members were either diagnosed with cancer or passed away. My closest aunt was involved in a horrific car accident (she was okay, but it was still very scary). My childhood dog I had since I was 12/13 years old had to be put to sleep because she could no longer walk and get around. Following a terrible windstorm in the early spring, the roof of our home was severely damaged, resulting in an incredibly expensive, financially draining repair process. And of course, this new government administration has been wreaking havoc on my sense of peace almost every day since day one (and I know I am not the only one here). This isn’t a fully comprehensive list, but you get the point, a lot happened in 2017 that was really hard to get through. When the stress of one incident subsided, another one would step in and take its place.

While 2017 was a really hard year for me, there was one thing in 2017 that made the hard days just a little bit easier: Reading. Reading, as I mentioned, has always helped me breathe a little better. It’s my absolute favorite form of escapism and has truly helped my mental health and wellbeing throughout my entire life. While spending time within the pages of my books, the rest of the world just falls away. This year, I read more books than I ever have in one year in my entire life. I read more diverse books by authors I had never heard of before with stories I had never lived. I read more fun books that I may not have tried had I not been on the lookout for new and exciting novels. I read more books that had important lessons in them that helped me grow as a person. I read more books PERIOD and despite the pain happening outside the pages, my books saved my life.

Without books, I would have drowned in my depression, my anxiety, and my overall lack of hope. I would have been someone who didn’t see that a world can get better once it implodes because there are people in it that are good. I would have felt isolated by the pain I was feeling for my family members, but through books, I realized that I was not alone. I would have been someone who lost their sense of creativity because when depression hits, everything else about you leaves. But through the creativity of the authors I read and the characters I met, I was able to be inspired constantly, making me a better blogger, photographer, and a better creative professional. Books, you saved me.

Another reason books saved my life is because of my new adventure into bookstagram (aka the book blogger Instagram scene). I had followed bookstagram accounts for years before, watching people post photos that took my breath away and getting book recommendations from people who were just as excited about literature as I was. I had so much fear when it came to starting my own account. I thought it would be unsuccessful, that my pictures wouldn’t be good enough, and that I would want to quit before I even got my account off the ground. Now, almost 5 months later, My account (@worldswithinpages) has grown to over 4,000 followers, I have started a blog to supplement what I want to say about what I am reading, I have started to grow in my photography abilities, and, most importantly, I have met people who I now consider my real friends that I never would have met otherwise. Without bookstagram, I wouldn’t have been so warmly welcomed into a community of people who accept me for who I am. This sense of belonging has been so healing for me and I can’t thank my bookish friends enough for everything they have done for me this year.

There were some great things that did happen to me in 2017 that I am thankful for. Two of the family members who were diagnosed with cancer went through treatment and are now cancer free! I was promoted at work, something I hadn’t expected to happen for another year or so. My library room (aka my safe space) has really come together and is shaping up to be beautiful thanks to some new décor and a few new bookshelves. I recently found out that I am going to be an Aunt for the very first time to my sister-in-law’s baby. I visited Disney World for the 4th time this year. My husband and I have a stronger-than-ever relationship after this year of hardship. The “presidency” has brought together so many people who are willing to fight against the bullcrap more fiercely than ever, which means I have a small amount of hope for 2018 and 2020 elections. Things were not all bad, but I am glad that I had my books along for each hurricane and ray of sunshine.

I am hopeful that 2018 will be better for me. I can only hope, as that is all I have within my control. In the meantime, I will curl up with a cup of tea, close the doors, wrap myself in fuzzy blankets and ride the waves of the storm. Shoot, I may even become the storm.

I owe a lot to reading, but mostly, I owe it my life.

Thanks for reading.

-Alisa

 

 

 

 

Review: The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater

Review: The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater

The adventures of the Raven Boys and Blue continues with this amazing sequel! I can’t say much about what happens in this book without giving too much away, but here is what I can tell you: I am falling more and more in love with this series and its characters with each page turned.

As I mentioned in my last review post, I am trying out a new reviewing format that I think will be much more fun than my normal droning on about a book you may have never read. For my reviews, I will tell you what the book made me feel, what it made me think, and what I learned from it. After all, these are the most important gifts that books give us: Feelings, thoughts, and lessons.

 

What this book made me feel: In this second installment of The Raven Cycle, there was a lot of emotions running high as the characters start to shift into place for who they will become throughout the rest of the series. A few major things I felt during this book were anticipation, sadness, and fear. Anticipation to find out who the heck this illusive “Gray Man” is, trying to figure out what Ronan is and why he can do what he can do (very vague, but trying not to spoil anything…), and who Blue will choose in the deeply heart-wrenching love triangle (because what YA novel doesn’t have SOME kind of love triangle after all)? My highest anticipation comes from that cliffhanger at the end of the book though where a character thought long gone comes back. What does this mean for Cabeswater and for the rest of the family? I felt sadness for a character who always seems to be getting the short end of the stick (Adam), for what Ronan finds out about the Gray Man, and for Blue, who can’t seem to come to terms with who she is and how her contributes to the story. The fear came in when monsters were afoot, but I will leave that for you to discover on your own!

What this book made me think: One of the things that this book made me think a lot about was the implications of the actions that you have on other people’s lives. Something that you may not realize will follow you for your entire life truly could. This is certainly the case with Ronan in this book and I felt awful that he had to deal with what he did. I also thought a lot about how Adam’s family’s actions toward him have made him in the person he is in this book and how our home life truly does shape who we become as human beings.

What I learned from this book: For a YA novel, there was definitely a lot to learn from this book. The main thing I learned is that no matter what, family comes first. Regardless of the odds that are against you, you need to do whatever you can to make sure that your family is safe and happy. They are the ones who, in the end, will be there for you to pull you through whatever hell it is that you are facing. Friends too, but family first.

 

In case you couldn’t tell already, I am LOVING this series so far. I can’t wait to finish it very soon and I will make sure to keep you all updated on how I continue to like it.

Let me know if you have read this series and enjoyed it! Who is your favorite character?

Thank you for reading!

 

-Alisa

 

 

Author Interview: Taylor Jenkins Reid

Author Interview: Taylor Jenkins Reid

Taylor-Jenkins-Reid-Photo

If you are a fan of modern fiction, it’s likely you’ve heard of novels written by Taylor Jenkins Reid. Her books have been featured as “Best Books of Summer” by People, Cosmopolitan, InStyle, Popsugar, and Buzzfeed and have been listed as New York Times Bestsellers.

Most recently, Taylor’s newest novel, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, was nominated for a Goodreads Award for Historical Fiction and is currently in the running for “Book of the Year” or “The Lolly Award” over at Book of the Month Club. As a huge fan of Taylor and every single one of her books I have read, I wanted to learn a little bit more from her about The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo and her writing process and goals in general when it came to this book. Her answers, as expected, were absolute perfection and I am so excited to share this interview with you. Thank you, Taylor, for being so kind and congratulations on your nominations!

Evelyn is the epitome of a Hollywood starlet. From her looks, to her talent, to the way the public reacts to her, it’s clear she was made for fame! However, the thing that inspired me the most about Evelyn was her strong, confident, and do-what-it-takes-to-get-what-I-want attitude. How important is it to you to create characters like Evelyn who are strong and powerful women? What message do you hope that sends to your readers?

Taylor: I think it is easier to understand ourselves when we have outside examples that resonate. That’s why representing various types of women, different types of marriages, different types of value systems, is important to me in my work. My hope is that Evelyn represents a different way to be – for better or worse. I’m not advocating that people do what Evelyn does. But I am advocating that women believe that their desires are paramount the way Evelyn does. Ambition, passion, confidence, relentlessness, power, even selfishness — these are traits I wanted to see more of in female characters so I wrote a woman with them.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo was nominated for a Goodreads Award for Historical Fiction and is currently in the running for the “Book of the Year” aka the “Lolly” over at Book of the Month Club. What are you the most proud of, besides award nominations, when it comes to The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo? Did you have any “writing goals” you accomplished in writing this book? 

Taylor: My hope with this book is that it would inspire intense reactions. I very much wanted Evelyn to be a character that people felt strongly about even when they felt conflicted about her. This book does seem to have made people think about their preconceived notions about some aspects of feminity and sexuality — and I know it has brought comfort to people fighting some of the same fights that Evelyn and Monique face. That was always my goal, is always my goal with every book.

Throughout the novel, Evelyn is being interviewed by an author. This author turns out to be the person who publishes the one and only book that tells the true story of Evelyn’s life. If you could choose one person whose life you would want to write the book for, who would you choose and why? Conversely, which author would you like to have write the story of your life? 

Taylor: I would love to know the whole truth behind the life of Lucille Ball. She has long been a hero of mine. As a child, I worshipped her talent and when I became an adult, I realized the depths of her business acumen and her accomplishments as a producer and head of a studio. I would have been honored to have been the one to tell her story.

As for my own, that is a tough question. So many of my favorite authors come to mind but it is hard to know who, exactly, I want to be filtered through. My best guess would be Cheryl Strayed. I suspect she would see things in me and my life that I have yet to discover for myself.

 

As a reader of almost every single one of your books (reading Maybe in Another Life later this month and completing the list!), I truly appreciate your work and recommend your novels to friends and family constantly. If someone were a “first time” Taylor Jenkins Reid reader, which book would you want them to read first and why?

Taylor: I think it depends on what they are looking for! But maybe One True Loves is a good place to start. It has both the romantic contemporary quality I had been writing up until Evelyn Hugo but also hints at some of the more daring women to come in my work. 

This is a random but fun question: What is your Hogwarts House?

Taylor: I’m embarrassed to admit I’ve never read or seen any of the Harry Potter stories. I realize this is heresy.  If it makes it any easier to bear, I have long planned on reading them all with my daughter once she is old enough. That being said, I took a sorting quiz to answer this question and after doing a very small amount of research, it seems to be pretty accurate. I’m in Hufflepuff! Which I’m happy about because I didn’t want to claim to be Gryffindor — that seems like saying you’re a Carrie when asked if you’re a Samantha, Miranda, or Charlotte.

 

If you haven’t read The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo yet, make sure you put it on your TBR as soon as possible. All of her books are phenomenal, but this one is by far my favorite of hers. It’s so unique, daring, and inspiring.

Thank you again to Taylor for answering my questions and thanks to all of you for reading!

-Alisa

 

*Taylor Jenkins Reid image provided by taylorjenkinsreid.com 

Goodreads Goal 2018? I don’t know her…

Goodreads Goal 2018? I don’t know her…

It seems a bit sacrilegious as a reader and book blogger to say this out loud, but here it goes…

*deep breath*

I am deeply considering not having a Goodreads goal this year?

Why would I do such a thing? Well, a few reasons.

  1. Reading shouldn’t be about racing through books to meet a goal.
    The enjoyment of books for me is deeply rooted in the time I spend with the plot and characters. You build relationships with books and appreciate them much more when you take your time. When you have a number you are chasing, it makes things a bit less patient and a little more rushed. While it’s good to have a goal for yourself and it feels SO gratifying to meet and beat those goals, I keep asking myself how much more I would enjoy reading if I didn’t have a quota. Chances are, it would be a lot more.
  2. Having book quotas and a number to reach really makes you shy away from reading longer books.
    I have noticed this issue a TON with not only myself, but other book bloggers I have talked to have said the same thing. With my current Goodreads goal in place, I have avoided books longer than 300 or so pages like the plague. Why? Because I could read 2 books and make a higher number at the end of the year if I just set it aside. There are so many big books I want to read in the New Year and if I am chasing a quota, I will never get to them.
  3. I am slowly letting myself come to terms with the fact that number of books read does not equal my “worth” as a reader.
    It’s hard to deny that when you see someone who has read 200 books in a year, you immediately become impressed with their ability to read that much. But does that make them a better reader, a more dedicated reader, or anything more than someone who read 2 books in a year? Nope. Not even remotely. While reading a ton of books IS impressive and proves that you are totally dedicated to your hobby, those who read less books or read just a bit more slowly are still just as valuable and worthy of being a part of the “bookworm club” as those who are speed demons! This is not a competition, we are all friends here. I used to think that if my number at the end of the year was a super high one, I would feel better about myself. But now that the year is coming to a close, I realize that what I gained from reading, what I learned from the books I read, and the friendships that I have made that have been formed around books are so much more valuable. Screw numbers!
  4. I TOTALLY smashed my reading amount from last year, and improvement is all that matters to me.
    Last year, I read 20 books for the entire year. That’s it. While that may be a lot to some people, that is very small compared to the fact that I am sneaking up on 80 read this year. THAT fact alone made me feel proud of myself, simply that I improved. I could have read 25 books this year and still been just as happy. But what made me more proud was that the books I read improved. As someone who was stuck in a cycle of always reading the same types of books from the same types of authors, I really broadened my horizons this year and read books I never would have considered before and tried out some new authors who have become lifelong favorites.

I still haven’t made a final decision on this yet, but I have the rest of December to think about it and make a final decision. What do you guys think? Are you into Goodreads goals? Do you set other goals for yourself that aren’t tied to number of books read? Let me know!

Thanks as always for reading and I will keep you updated on what I decide!

Love always,

-Alisa

Review: The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

Review: The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

““There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.”

In a town that is anything but normal, four private school boys (Gansey, Adam, Ronan, and Noah) and one daughter of a psychic and eccentric line of matriarchs (Blue) meet one another with one mission in mind: Find the ley lines, and locate Glendower (a long-dead and buried king) to be granted a favor. That is, according to legend, how it should work. Simple right?

In this stunning fantasy novel, Maggie Stiefvater creates a story of friendship, love, strength, adventure, magic, and ultimate sacrifice. Through the different layers of the character’s lives (what I might call a literary lasagna), we learn about the motives that drive each character and the lengths they are willing to go to in order to get what they want.

For Blue, all she wants is to be able to be herself. With a love triangle on the horizon and her knowledge that, if she kisses her true love, he will die, Blue struggles to balance her needs to express her feelings with, frankly, not wanting to kill the poor guy. Not only does she struggle with her emotional conflictions but she also struggles with the fact that in her entire line of aunts and mother, she is the only one who does not possess psychic abilities. While she can act as a sort of “sound and energy magnifier” for others, she cannot see the future on her own and make predictions. This leads to her feeling almost inadequate and frustrated, missing how valuable she truly is to the story.

For Gansey, he is a one-track-mind kind of guy. He wants to find Glendower and he wants to be granted his favor for waking him. What Dansey wants to find him for and the favor he will request is still unclear, but his dedication to finding him begs the question: What does Dansey want? Oh, and throw in a little pining for a girl who may or may not be interested in him? Yeah, that makes it a little bit more complicated.

For Adam, his motivation is making something of himself, by himself. Even though he attends an incredibly expensive private school, Adam’s home and family background is anything but the white-collar yacht-club glamorous lives that have been the hallmark of Aglionby (the private school) students. While Adam struggles with the financial reality he is faced with, he also starts to have feelings for someone that turns his life into both a positive new world and a dangerous gamble.

As for Ronan, I am still unsure what his motivations are other than being that kind of “he’s a jerk, but we love him” kind of character. However, I do think his motivations will become more clear in the second book, as the last line of The Raven Boys dropped a HUGE nugget of a plot twist.

For this review, I want to try something new for how I review the books I read. I believe that the three most important things about books are what we feel when we read them, what they made us think about, and what we learned from them.

So, without further ado, here is an introduction to my new reviewing style AND how they apply to my reading of The Raven Boys.

What this book made me feel: The major theme that I found in The Raven Boys was love. The characters struggle with love, fight for love, sacrifice themselves in the name of love, love their families, love their town, and most importantly love one another. While reading these themes of love, it made me feel like I truly was a part of their friendship circle. Each character so deeply cared for one another that I felt myself longing to understand a friendship so protective and selfless. I also felt sad for the characters when the love that they had for their families caused them pain. Adam, in particular, felt this pain (no spoilers). I was heartbroken and heart warmed all throughout this book by the different acts of love sprinkled in the novel.

What this book made me think: Sacrifice is a major component of this story, especially at the end of the novel. What this book made me think about overall was “What would I be willing to sacrifice for the ones that I loved”? It also goes without saying that, because this a quadrilogy (four-book series), my thoughts the entire time, all the way up until the last sentence was “WHAT THE HECK IS GOING TO HAPPEN NEXT?!”

What I learned from this book: There are so many lessons to be learned from this book, but one of the main things I learned from reading it was that there is an incredible amount of importance in having friends surrounding you that support you, encourage you, and help you accomplish your goals no matter how odd or unbelievable they may seem. Without each person in this book supporting each other, there would have been a very different story to tell. Good friends are hard to find, but Blue and the Raven Boys are a group of friends that mesh together so well, you would think they were all related.

Overall, I GREATLY enjoyed this book. It is rare that YA novels leave me feeling completely satisfied with the story, but this one was an easy 5/5 stars! I will say that the plot did have a tendency to drag at times, but I feel that the occasional slow down really helped to paint a more in-depth picture of who each character was. You know that I really enjoyed a novel when I stay up until midnight to read over 200 pages just so I can find out what happens next!

Let me know what you think of this new format, as I will likely be using it in the future. I know that I personally prefer to read shorter reviews, and I think that my “feel, think, learned” method will make it a lot more fun!

Thanks for reading!

-Alisa